Battery

Battery

Battery is when a person actually and intentionally touches or strikes another person against the will of that person. The offense of battery also occurs when on intends to cause another person great bodily harm, in which may cause permanent disfigurement or permanent disability. This type of battery is considered to be a misdemeanor of first degree, which can be punished by up to one year in prison. 
Armed Battery
Armed battery occurs when a person committing a battery against another person carries a firearm or any other deadly weapon against that person. A person that has committed this crime has committed a felony of first degree, in which can be punishable of a maximum prison sentence of thirty years.
A person may be imprisoned for life for committing an armed battery. If a weapon was present the seriousness of a crime may increase extensively. Florida has a sentencing enhancement statute which requires the sentencing judge to sentence upon conviction to ten years of prison if a firearm is displayed during the commission of the felony, twenty years if the firearm is discharged, and life if anyone is injured by the use of the firearms.
Felony Battery
Felony battery is when a person intentionally touches or strikes another person and intends to cause the victim great bodily harm as well, in which includes causing permanent disability or permanent disfigurement. Once this battery has been committed the person is said to have committed a felony battery of the third degree. This type of battery can be punishable by up to five years in prison.
Aggravated Battery
Aggravated battery occurs when a person intentionally touches or strikes another person and intends to cause the victim great bodily harm, and intentionally causes permanent disability or permanent disfigurement, and commits the crime with a deadly weapon.